Toyota recalls 179000 cars in australia with the potentially deadly takata airbag

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TOYOTA has added 179,000 cars in Australia — including the popular Yaris and Corolla hatchbacks — to its recall for potentially deadly Takata airbags.

It brings the total number of cars affected in Australia to about 1.4 million the biggest recall in Australian automotive history and brings Toyotas tally to 437,000 vehicles locally, which means it has overtaken Honda, which previously had the most affected cars (421,000).

The Takata airbags which can spray shrapnel in a crash have so far been linked to 13 fatalities overseas but none in Australia.

Approximately 100 million cars are affected globally and the airbag industry is struggling to produce replacement parts, with some customers waiting more than a year to have their airbags replaced.

It means there are about 900,000 cars on Australian roads that have not had their airbags replaced.

The faulty airbags do not deploy randomly, but there is a chance they can spray shrapnel if activated in a crash.

Cars in humid climates such as Australia are worst affected.

Internal testing by airbag manufacturer Takata, which supplies approximately 20 per cent of the worlds airbags, found 265 of 30,000 recalled airbags had ruptured or slightly less than 1 per cent.

Based on these estimates, that means approximately 10,000 cars in Australia are driving around with a ticking time bomb if the airbag is activated in a crash.

A statement from Toyota Australia states that the new models affected by the Takata recall include the Avensis Verso, Corolla and Yaris models with build dates ranging between March 2007 and December 2011.

For further information, customers can contact the Toyota recall campaign helpline on 1800 987 366 or click on this link for more information.

Other affected car brands in Australia include BMW, Mercedes, Chrysler, Ferrari, Ford, Honda, Jeep, Lexus, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan and Subaru.

Japanese auto-parts maker Takata is set to recall up to 40 million more air-bag inflaters, adding to the 28.8 million air bags already being recalled. Here's what you need to know, by the numbers.